Knowledge Exchange

History Courses

Application deadline: 16 March 2018

Credit bearing courses with the ARTS prefix are for exchange and visiting students only, while HIST2093, HIST2107 and HIST2159, courses with the GCIN prefix and the Chinese as a Foreign Language courses CHIN9511 and CHIN9522 are for all undergraduate students, including eligible HKU students. Fee exemption/reduction applies for HKU students and students under formal HKU exchange agreements. 

Please, note that no add/drop will be permitted after the commencement of the summer courses.

HIST2093 Hong Kong and the Development of Global business after the Second World War (6 credits)

The course explores the history of international business in the twentieth century. It aims to equip students with a comprehensive understanding of the causative factors that drove international business in this period; to offer a firm basis for more advanced work in global business and its history; and to provide the factual grounding and conceptual apparatus necessary to understand the contemporary world. The course will examine the development of many aspects of present-day global business activity, such as the emergence and global expansion of consulting, management, accountancy, corporate law, and branding. Students will examine related developments such as the emergence of business schools, their teaching and research foci, and their diffusion around the globe. The course covers many geographical areas, but focuses on East Asia, and in particular Hong Kong.

Eligibility: Undergraduate students from HKU and overseas universities 

Period of Teaching: Session C: July 16  August 3, 2018 (three weeks); Mon to Fri, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.      

Programme Fee: HKD13,000

Course Description: please click here

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HIST2107 The Second World War in Asia and the Pacific, 1931-1952 (6 credits)

This course is an introduction to the history of the Second World War in Asia and the Pacific. Focusing largely on military affairs and international relations, students will examine how established imperial powers were eclipsed by a new global economic order shaped by US-Soviet superpower rivalry. Students will gain a greater understanding of the significance of the war in Asia and the Pacific, and how its impact is still felt today.

Several key themes and questions will be explored to help students understand the war’s significance. Why was it a total war? Why did it help create the Cold War? Part of the answer to these questions can be found by first examining Japanese aggression in China and the destruction of British and Japanese imperial power. The impact of geography and technology on the evolution of US military doctrine also played an important role. When technology was combined with racial hatred, the destructiveness of war intensified to a level never before experienced. During this conflict warfare became an activity that now threatens human existence. Thus, the ethics of war will also be discussed.

Eligibility: Undergraduate students from HKU and overseas universities 

Period of Teaching: Session C: July 16  August 3, 2018 (three weeks); Mon to Fri, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.      

Programme Fee: HKD13,000

Course Description: please click here

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asia

HIST2159 Chasing the Dragon: Alcohol, Drugs and Imperialism in Asia, 1700-2000 (6 credits)

This course aims to introduce students to key themes and debates in the study of intoxicating substances and imperialism, with a focus on Asia. It will explore the various uses to which alcohol and drugs were put in the colonies and in the independent countries which were confronted with the realities of imperial hegemony. It will unpack the myriad interests which underpinned and therefore characterised colonial drug policy. Whilst it acknowledges the impact of colonial policies on the rise of nationalist movements, the course seeks to transcend the paradigm of exploitation and resistance. For instance, it will examine how the farms and monopolies that were established to ensure the steady supply of alcohol and drugs introduced new opportunities as well as challenges for subject populations, and probe the transnational networks that both enabled and regulated their consumption. To this end, students will be invited to think critically about the political, economic and social dimensions of the subject in order to derive a nuanced understanding of the interrelationship between drugs and power.

Eligibility: Undergraduate students from HKU and overseas universities 

Period of Teaching: Session C: July 16  August 3, 2018 (three weeks); Mon to Fri, 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.      

Programme Fee: HKD13,000

Course Description: please click here

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